The broken system


untitled (158)Yesterdays angry exchange between our political ‘leaders’ in the debating chamber of the House of Commons on the subject of electoral reform was a case study in proving the disconnect between the Political world and the world the rest of us inhabit. As Gerald Kaufman claimed William Hagues proposals were not worthy of the term a dogs breakfast, and that if the system is not broken, why try to fix it, another voice cried out in anger that the system is indeed broken. The debate carried on amongst these men and women who have been elected to represent us, yet any idea that you and I had been consulted and that they were indeed reflecting disquiet amongst the populace has been replaced with a very familiar self serving party political agenda. There is no need to consult constituents when Party advantage is so evident and so naked, indeed to do so would merely prove that the Emperor really has no clothes. The debate yesterday proved once again that there are many issues which need to be decided by people elected by us to bring leadership into our nation, but whose election is disconnected from the toxic demands and bias of our Political Parties. Of course all of the existing Politicians and indeed lobbyists such as the Tax Payers Alliance (who are in any case proxies for parts of one of our parties) will claim that the electorate don’t want any more politicians running the country. In case these people have missed the signs, most of this rejection of new structures comes from people who believe the existing ones need to go too. Any new political structures would of course need to come in a manner that reduces the cost of our existing political structures, but that doesn’t seem like to much of a challenge to set, we do have the largest Parliamentary structures when compared to most other democracies.

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About ianchisnall

I have a passion to see public policy made accessible everyone who want to improve the wellbeing of their communities. I am interested in issues related to crime and policing as well as in policies on health services and strategic planning.
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